2.1.19 – Ayurvedic Aspect Of Bacteria And Bacterial Food Poisoning.

Original Article – http://ijpsr.com/bft-article/ayurvedic-aspect-of-bacteria-and-bacterial-food-poisoning/?view=fulltext

Author – Savita Saini* and Sharad Maroti Porte

National Institute of Ayurveda, Jaipur, Rajasthan, India


ABSTRACT:  Bacterial Food Poisoning’ is a common name given to predominantly gastro-intestinal infections which arise after the consumption of food or drink that is contaminated with disease-causing bacteria. Over 250 organisms are known to cause food borne illnesses. Ayurveda is an ancient medical science & has described the food poisoning indirectly in the form of Anna Vishaktata. The aims of present study are to collect, elaborate, evaluate & discuss the Bacteria and Bacterial Food Poisoning in aspect of Ayurveda. In Ayurveda there are so many words are used for bacteria like invisible krimi, Vaikaric krimi, Agantuj, Rakshasa, Bhut and Pisacha directly, indirectly. In the 19th century Acharya Gannath Sen translate the word bacteria in the form of Jeevanu which is causative factor for many diseases. The infectious food poisoning which may be due to ingestion of food/water contaminated with poisons of Agantuj (pathogens including bacteria) is also found in Ayurveda. The infectious disease is given under Aupasargik Vyadhi & Epidemiology is elaborated under the heading of Janapadadhwansa in Ayurveda. The utilization of unhygienic utensil, uncooked, semi cooked food, decomposed meats etc. are the causes of food poisoning as per Ayurveda which is similar as described in Modern Medicine. There are abundant of herbal, mineral and herbo-mineral ayurvedic drug useful for bacterial food poisoning which having significant in vitro antibacterial efficacy on enteric pathogens. The method described for the prevention in Ayurveda is equally important as Modern Medicine with some addition


Keywords: 

Food Poisoning, Bacterial Food Poisoning, Anna VishaktataJeevanu


INTRODUCTION: Food poisoning is a common, usually mild, but sometimes deadly illness. Several factors could contribute to food poisoning. Food poisoning comes from eating foods that contain germs like pathogenic bacteria or toxins, which are poisonous substances. Food borne illnesses are prevalent in all parts of the world, and the toll in terms of human life and suffering is enormous. Contaminated food contributes to 1.5 billion cases of diarrhea in children each year, resulting in more than three million premature deaths, according to the World Health Organization (WHO) 1.

Those deaths and illnesses are shared by both developed and developing nations. The World Health Organization (WHO) reports that each year two billion illnesses are caused by unsafe food; globally this number is growing. In Asia 700,000 people have dies each year as a result of food poisoning illnesses 2. Under the Integrated Disease Surveillance Project (IDSP) in India, food poisoning outbreaks reported from all over India in 2009 increased to more than double as compared to the previous year (120 outbreaks in 2009, as compared to 50 in the year 2008) 3.

According to the Sushruta Krimidosh is one of cause of Atisar, which mean micro-organism affect the human being and cause many infectious diseases. Many time these organism cause massive effect on community. Yajurveda also mention the Food Poisoning caused due to eating in unhygienic utensils. Ayurveda has described the pathogenic micro-organism indirectly in the form of invisible krimi responsible for producing many diseases. Ayurveda has also described herbal, mineral and herbo-mineral compound for such infectious disease including bacteria along with food poison prevention.

MATERIAL & METHOD:

The material about Bacteria and Bacterial Food Poisoning collected from the text books of Atharva Veda, Yajurveda, Kautilaya Arthashastra, Brihatrayi & Laghutrayi. The research article of concerns subjects published in national-international journals are referred & discussed. The text book of Modern Medicine also referred whenever necessary.

Ayurvedic Concept of Infectious Disease:

Acharya Charak stated that there are two factor responsible for disease one is internal factor mean doshavikriti and second is external factor mean Agantuj (contaminated water, food, microbes, trauma) 4Acharya Susruta has described that the diseases like kustha (Leprosy), Jwara (pyrexia) , Shosha (kock’s or tuberculosis)  are contagious and spreads or occurring direct contact or by use of contaminated objects. all forms  of Prasnaga (contacts), Gatra Sansparsha (direct contacts), eating together, sleeping together (including sexual contact), sharing and using of others cloths, ornaments, ointments etc. leads to diseases like KusthaJwaraShoshaNetrabhishyanda (conjunctivitis), and in this manner the disease spread from person to person, which is called as an Aupsargic disease 5.

Acharya Charaka has described role of Vayu (air), Udak (Water), Desha (soil & area), Kala (Time) responsible for Janapadodhwansha (epidemics), most of the infectious disease and contamination of physical, chemical & biological factors in occurrence of disease 6Dalhan in his commentary on sushruta stated that upsargaja means micro -organism affect the human being and cause many infectious diseases. Many times these organism cause massive effect on community.7 Acharya sushruta also described the causative animal, clinical feature of Jalsantras which is very much similar to hydrophobia which approved today that it is a viral disease8.

Ayurvedic Concept of Bacteria:

In Athrvaveda two types of krimi (organism) described- Drisya (visible) and Adrisya (invisible) and minute form of krimi is called “Kshullaka”10Athrvaveda has also mentioned that there are two type of krimi namely Durnam which mean pathogenic and sunam which means non-pathogenic 11. In Mahabharata Maharshi Veda Vyasa mentioned that there are abounded of microbes which will identify by conclusion 12Acharya charak also stated 2 type of krimi one is vaikaric means pathogenic and second is sahaj which means non-pathogenic 13. In Charak samhita three major division of disease i.e. Agantuj Vyadhis are caused also due to krimi 14Today bacteriologist also classified the pathogenic and nonpathogenic bacteria.

In 19th century Acharya Gananath Sen has translated the bacteria as a Jeevanu which is responsible most of the infectious disease and Enteric fever under the heading of Antrik Jwar & stated that it is due to ingestion of bacterial contaminated food and water which is spread by stool & urine 15.

Ayurvedic Concept of Bacterial Food Poisoning:

According to Atharvaveda jantu (organism) can originate anywhere in the environment. They grow on the earth, in forest, water air, soils also in medicinal plant, food material, drinks also in bird’s animals etc. These organisms may grow where ever they get favorable conditions 16. Spreading of krimis taken placed through food, gruel, milk and water 17Athrvaveda also stated that microbes may invade uncooked; semi cooked food and contaminates them. If an individual consumes such food material it has potential to harm the body 18.

Ayurvedic Aspect of Nidan (Causes) of Bacterial Disease and Bacterial Food Poisoning:

CharakSushrut and Vagabhat have been accepted that food material whether fresh or rotten, is one of the causative factors for krimiroga. Charak further stated that Puti ahara (fetid), Klinna ahara (Putrefied) Sandust ahara (ill disposed) and Asuchi ahara (foul) are the synonym, which are used for rotten and contaminated food 19, 20, 21.  Such food material is a good vehicle for Krimi (micro-organism) to get enter in host. Athrava Veda mentioned the microbes may invade uncooked; semi cooked food and contaminates them. If an individual consumes such food material it has potential to harm the body 22Gananath Sen has mentioned the diarrhea caused due to ingestion of Jeevanu (translated for bacteria) and its toxin contaminated food and waters. He also stated that Anna Visa (food poisoning) one of the cause of diarrhea 23.

Ayurvedic Aspect of Samprapati (Pathogenesis):

Jeevanu (Micro-organism) and its toxin causes vitiation of entire Doshas and then irritation, inflammation to Annavaha and Purishvah Srotas (gastro intestinal tract) which produce vomiting, loose motion, colic pain and fever generally.

Bacterial Etiology of Food Poisoning As Per Modern Medicine:

Bacterial food poisoning may be divided into two groups 1. Infection Type- This results from ingestions of viable micro-organisms that multiply in the gastrointestinal tract producing infections as, for example, salmonella group of organisms 2. Toxin Type- This results from ingestions of the micro-organisms which presents in the food & produces toxin before or after being ingested. Bacteria are tiny organisms that can cause infections of the GI tract.

Clinical Feature of Bacterial Food Poisoning As Per Ayurveda:

Acharya Trimal Bhatt mentioned the clinical manifestation like diarrhea, vomiting, abdominal pain, fever of Agantuj Jwar (Exoteric) due to Visjanya Abhisang (Exotoxin) which is mimics to bacterial food poisoning 24Gananath Sen in his commentary Siddanth Nidan mentioned Anna Visaj Atisar (Food Poisoning) and its clinical manifestation like diarrhea, vomiting, abdominal pain, fever, thirst which are exactly similar to bacterial food poisoning 25Sushrita again stated that Food mixed with poison, when it reaches the Amasaya (stomach) gives rise to vomiting, Atisara (loose motion), and distention of the abdomen, a burning sensation, shivering and a derangement of the sense-organs & Syncope 26.

Clinical Feature of Bacterial Food Poisoning as Per Modern Medicine:

Patients with food borne illnesses typically present with gastrointestinal tract symptoms (example- vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain); however nonspecific symptoms &neurologic symptoms may occur. When someone does not drink enough fluids to replace those that are lost through vomiting and diarrhea, dehydration can result.

TABLE 1: EXAMINATION OF CONTAMINATED LIQUID FOOD (MILK) AS PER AYURVEDA

Sr.Name of ExaminationObservation
1Examination by means of touchSlimy, insect laden, disagreeable to teeth, hot or thick feeling.
2Examination by means of appearanceDiscolored, insanitary & frothy.
3Examination by means of tasteDistasteful, tasteless, sour & salty.
4Examination by means of smellFowl or flesh

Touch of the contaminated water will be slimy, insect laden, disagreeable to teeth, hot or thick feeling and discolored, insanitary & frothy in appearance. Taste of this water will be distasteful, Tasteless; Sour & Salty while Fowl or Flesh in smell 27, 28, 29, 30.

Examination of Contaminated Food as Per Ayurveda:

Poisoned food burns making loud cracks, and when cast into the fire it assumes the colour of a peacock’s throat, becomes unbearable, burns in severed and disjointed flames and emits irritating fumes and it cannot be speedily extinguished 31. Preparations of potherbs, soups, boiled rice and

cooked meat are instantaneously decomposed, and become putrid, tasteless and omit little odour when in contact with poison. All kinds of food become tasteless, odourless and colorless when in contact with poison 32.

Ayurvedic Management of Bacterial Food Poisoning:

Rigveda has mentioned the physician called Rakshoha who manage the invisible minute krimi 33Atharvaveda has mention that Agni 34 and Surya 35 has Rakshoghn properties which will be helped to destroy the invisible minute krimi. Acharya charak has described the YuktiVyapaashrya Chikitsa which is unique three fold management for the disease esp. occurring due to any infections. Further Charaka Acharya has described the three different modalities in management of Krimi (micro & macro organisms tend to produce disease) – Apakarshana (removal of the causative factor), Prakriti Vighata (interruption in the nature of causative factor) and Nidaana Parivarjana (escaping of causative factor) 36.

TABLE 2: CHIEF INGREDIENT OF HERBAL AND HERBO-MINERAL COMPOUND USED FOR BACTERIAL FOOD POISONING WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO ATISAR

Sr.no.CompoundChief ingredient
1Rasanjanadi Churna 37Berberis aristata, Aconitum heterophyllum, Holarrhena antidysentericaWoodfordia fruticosa
2Kapitthadi Churna 38Woodfordia fruticosa,, Zingiber officinalePiper longum, Piper nigum
3Pipplyadi Yog 39Piper longumPlumbago zeylanica
4Kutaj Phanit 40Holarrhena antidysenterica
5Atisarhar Yog 41Glycyrrhiza glabraAegle marmelos
6Atisarhar Twak 42Terminalia arjunaManjifera indicaSyzygium cuminiBoswellia serrata
7Kapitthastak Churna 43Limonia acidissimaZingiber officinalePiper longum, Piper nigumPlumbago zeylanica
8Darimaastak Churna 44Punica granatumZingiber officinalePiper longum, Piper nigum
9Jambvadi Patra Swaras 45Syzygium cuminiManjifera indicaPhyllanthus emblica
10Babul Patradi Ras 46Acacia niloticaHolarrhena antidysenterica
11Ankot Kalk 47Alengium Salvifolium
12Laghu Gangadhar Churna 48Cyperus rotundusHolarrhena antidysentericaAegle marmelosSymplocos racemosa, Woodfordia fruticosaSalmalia malbarica
13Dhanya Panchak quath 49Coriandrum sativum
14Gangadhar Churna 50Salmalia malbaricaCyperus rotundus
15Satavari Kalk 51Asparagus racemosus
16Chitrakadi Quath 52Plumbago zeylanica
17PurnChandrodayRas 53Hartal, Lauha, Abhrak, MurcuryZingiber officinalePiper longum, Piper nigum
18Vrihad Gagansunder Ras 54Parad, Abhrak, LauhaAconitum heterophyllum
19JatiphalaRas 55Mercury, AbhrakHolarrhena antidysentericaTankan,Zingiber officinalePiper nigum
20AbhaynrisinghoRas 56Hingul,Aconitum feroxZingiber officinalePiper nigum,TankanMercury, Abhrak
21KarpurRas 57Hingul, Papaver somniferm, Cyperus rotundus, Holarrhena antidysenterica, Myristica fragrans, Karpura
22AtisarVarnoRas58Hingul, KarpuraCyperus rotundusHolarrhena antidysenterica
23Kanadhay Lauha 59Zingiber officinalePiper longumtriphala (Termenalia chebula+Termenalia belrica+ Phyllanthus emblica), Zingiber officinalePiper longum, Piper nigum,
24AnandbhairavRas 60,61HingulAconitum feroxSuhagaPiper nigumPiper longum
25SudhasarRas 62Mercury, Holarrhena antidysentericaAconitum feroxZingiber officinale
26RasotamRas 63SudhasarRas Zingiber officinaleCyperus rotundus
27LaghulaiChurna 64Mercurytrikatu
28MritSanjivanRas 65Mercury, AbhrakPiper longumHolarrhena antidysenterica

As the causative organisms of Atisar (diarrhoea) and bacterial food poisoning are nearly similar. Hence the herbal and herbo- mineral compound mention in Ayurveda for treatment of Atisar will be used for treatment of bacterial food poisoning.

The commonly used herbs as an ingredient of Ayurvedic compounds used for treatment of Atisar are Berberis aristata, Aconitum heterophyllum, Holarrhena antidysentericaWoodfordia  fruticosa, Limonia acidissima, Piper longum, Piper nigum, Zingiber officinale, Plumbago zeylanica, Aegle marmelos, Syzygium cumini, Punica granatumAcacia niloticaAlangium salviifolium, Cyperus rotundus, Coriandrum sativum, Asparagus racemosus.

The antimicrobial activity of aqueous and ethanolic extracts of Berberis aristata and berberine, an active principle of Berberis aristata shows the zone of inhibition on enterogenic pathogen like Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis 66Another study showed the strong antibacterial potential against gram negative bacteria including Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteus Vulgaris and Enterobacter aerogenes 67.

The antibacterial study revealed that antibacterial activity of Aconitum heterophyllum alkaloids from root shows synergistic effect of different alkaloids 68. It was observed that methanolic extract of Aconitum heterophyllum was the most potent extract which showed significant inhibition of the growth of Gram positive bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis 69.

The antimicrobial study showed that extracts of bark, seed and callus of Holarrhena antidysenterica possess nearly similar potential for antibacterial activity against pathogenic bacteria like Staphylococcus aureusSalmonella typhimurium and Eschercia coli 70. The antimicrobial activity of H. antidysenterica bark extract has been reported against enteropathogens like enteroinvasive Escherichia coliSalmonella typhimurium, Salmonella enteritidis, Shigella flexneri, Sh.boydii and Vibrio cholera 71.

Extract prepared from leaf and flower samples of Woodfordia fruticosa showed antimicrobial property against Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureusSalmonella Typhi, Salmonella paratyphiCitrobacter frendii, Pseudomonas aeruginosaEscherichia coliProteus mirabilisKlebsiella pneumoniaeShigella dysenteriae, Enterobacter spp., Acenitobacter spp72.

The methanolic extract of Pulp of Limonia acidissima was found to possess highest antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus epidermidis followed by Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis 73.

The study showed that Zingiber officinale (ginger) has antimicrobial activities on the Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli due to its inhibitory effect74. Another study showed that two extracts of Zingiber officinale had antimicrobial activity, methanol extract was superior than n-hexane extract against the same tested microorganisms- Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella sp., Escherichia coli, Proteus sp. Enterococcus sp. and Pseudomonas fluorescent 75.

In the antimicrobial study Piperine (chemical constituent of Piper nigrum) was evaluated for its antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli 76. In another study the extract of Piper nigrum was evaluated for antibacterial activity. The results indicate excellent inhibition on the growth of gram positive bacteria like Staphylococcus aureus, followed by Bacillus cereus and Streptococcus faecalis 77.

The antimicrobial study showed that among the entire gram positive bacteria Staphylococcus aureus was highly sensitive in presence of ethyl acetate extract of fruit of Piper longum 78. In another study the antimicrobial activity of P.longum extracts has been evaluated in vitro against two gram positive bacteria stains such as Steptococcus faecalis, Steptococcus pyogens and two gram negative bacteria such as E.coli and Salmonella paratyphi 79.

The antimicrobial effect of Plumbago zeylanica Linn. (Plumbaginaceae) leaf extract was evaluated on microbial strains like gram positive species Staphylococcus aureus, and Bacillus subtilis and gram negative species Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa 80.

The in vitro antimicrobial activity of petroleum ether, chloroform and methanol extracts from leaves of Aegle marmelos exhibited broad spectrum antimicrobial activity against bacteria: Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus haemolyticus, Proteus mirabilis, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhi 81. The another antibacterial study showed that the methanolic extract from the leaves, bark and fruit of A. marmelos has significant antibacterial activity against Bacillus subtilisStaphylococcus aureus , Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis, Escherichia coli, Salmonella paratyphi A and Salmonella paratyphi 82.

The methanol and aqueous extracts of the leaves of Syzygium cumini showed the antimicrobial activity against Salmonella enteritidis, Salmonella typhi, Salmonella typhi A, Salmonella paratyphi A, Salmonella paratyphi B, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coliBacillus subtilis, and Staphylococcus aureus 83.

The in vitro antibacterial activities of different extracts of pomegranate fruit peels and arils (with seeds) were investigated Escherichia coli, and Salmonella typhimurium against food-related bacteria (Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus84.

The methanolic extract of leaf of the plant Acacia nilotica showed significant antibacterial activity against Bacillus subtilis, Escherchia coli, stphaylocuccus aureus and pseudomonas fluorescence 85. Ethanolic extract of different plant parts of Alangium salviifolium Linn, showed significant antibacterial activity against Escherichia coliPseudomonas aureginosa, and Staphylococcus aureus 86.

The Antibacterial activity of Cyperus rotundus oil was shown a remarkable activity against microorganisms (Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus vulgaris, Streptococcus pyogenes, Eschirichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa87.

Antimicrobial effects of seed extract of coriander (Coriandrum sativum) was showed   inhibitory activity on Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Mycobacterium smegmatis, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhimurium, Enterococcus faecalis and Micrococcus luteus88.

Methanolic extract of Asparagus racemosus was found to be effective against bacterial Strains: Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas alkaligenes, Proteus specie, Shegella, Salmonella typhi, Vibrio cholera and Staphylococcus aureus 89.  Hingul, Parad, and Gandhak are the chief ingredient of herbo-mineral ayurvedic compound along with herbal medicine. Hingul have significant antimicrobial efficacy with special reference to enterogenic pathogens and bacteria causing Food Poisoning 90. Metal chelates of mercury have been screened for antimicrobial activity on Escherichia coliBacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus 91The herbs used in this compound having Usna, Tikshna, Katu and Tikta in properties which will helped to remove the bacteria and its toxins from human body.

Ancients Method of Prevention of Bacterial Food Poisoning:

In his famous book Arthshastra, Kautilya stated and warned to public not to permit to sale the contaminated, putrefied and decomposed meat of any animals which are cute outside of slaughter house and died due to any disease. The person who will infracted this rule he will be punished with penalty of twelve Panha (Moryakalin currency) 92. Sushrit stated about the mode of preparing the soup that the flesh of a Godhamungoose, or deer should be cooked and spiced with pasted Pdlindi (Trivrit), Yashti- madhu and sugar.

The flesh of a peacock should be similarly cooked and spiced with sugar, Ativisha and Sunthi and that of a Prishata deer with Pippali and sunthi. The soup of S’imbi taken with honey and clarified butter should, similarly, be deemed beneficial (as being possessed of similar antitoxic properties). A king should always use food and drink of poison destroying properties 93Sushrita has mentioned the guideline for the Rajavaidya (Doctor) that Pakashala (kitchen) for the King should be constructed in Agneya (south-eastern) direction & excellent environments. Further he stated that vessels used in kitchen should be clean & neat, so that bacterial & any other contamination will be prevented 94.

Current Method of Prevention of Bacterial Food Poisoning:

Food borne illnesses can be prevented by properly storing, cooking, cleaning, and handling of edible foods. It is need to take the fresh foods always in dinner, lunch or breakfast. The remaining foods should be keep in refrigerator by setting below 40 degree F and freezer on 0 degree F. The raw foods like meat should be cooked long enough at high temperature to kill the harmful bacteria that causes illness. The chop of beef, pork and lamb should be roasted on 145 degree and 165 degree for poultry. Cold foods should be kept in cold pot and hot foods should be kept in hot pot. People should wash their hands for at least 20 seconds with warm, soapy water before and after handling raw meat, poultry, fish, shellfish, produce, or eggs. Utensils and surfaces should be washed with hot, soapy water before and after they are used to prepare food 95.

DISCUSSION: Ayurveda has also found the description about the infectious & contagious diseases under the heading of Aupsargik Sankramak Vyadi respectively along with Janapadadhwansa (Epidemiology) of infectious & other disease. Though the description of Sukshmajeeva (micro –organism) has known to our ancient Rishimunies Acharya which is found in Veda Ayurvda, the term ‘Jeevanu’ has been used to translate Bacteria at first time in the 19th century. As such direct description of food poisoning & bacterial food poisoning is not found in any texts of Veda & Ayurveda, but the Atharva Veda stated about the contaminations due to microbes may invade uncooked, semi cooked, cooked food.

Acharya Gananath Sen also mentioned the Atisar (Diarrhea) due to ingestion of Jeevanu-janya Anna (bacterial contaminated food) and its clinical feature similar to bacterial food poisoning. The examinations stated in Ayurveda for poisonous & contaminated food are very important & practical because it may be helped to decide whether the food having contaminated or not and may help to prevent the poisoning. Charaka describes in three different modalities in management of Krimi (micro & macro organisms tend to produce disease) like Apakarshana, Prakriti Vighata and Nidaana Parivarjana.

Apakarshana is the process of removal of disease producing Krimi (micro &macro organisms) out of body using therapeutic purification. But Bacterial Food Poisoning having already vomiting and purgation and micro-organism, its toxin removed out in this process. So there is no needing have further induce emesis and purgation in Bacterial Food Poisoning. PrakritiVighata is a very unique medicament described by Charaka that uses the drugs which stops growth of disease producing microbes by creating an unfavourable condition of growth of these organisms.

In Prakriti Vighata drugs having Katu, Tikta, Kashaaya, KshraUshna etc. Gunas (properties) are utilized which decreases Kapha and Malas on which these microorganisms leading to disease. As increased number of the microbes will increase toxin load and also uses body physiological mechanism in increasing the number more, thus disease progress and if this chain is blocked at this level, disease even though occurs will be of mild form, requires very less medication, reduces toxicity & complications and early recovery.

Thus load on the medical management may be decreased. Nidaana Parivarjana is the most efficient method of managing the disease condition. Stopping the invasion of pathgnomic organisms into the body will ceases the chances of getting disease. The herbal and herbo-mineral compound described in Ayurveda for Atisar can be used as antimicrobial agent for bacterial food poisoning, as the maximum ingredients like Hingula, Parada, Piper longum, Piper nigum, Berberis aristata, Aconitum heterophyllum, Holarrhena antidysentericaWoodfordia fruticosa, Limonia acidissima, Zingiber officinale, Plumbago zeylanica, Aegle marmelos, Syzygium cumini, Punica granatumAcacia niloticaAlangium salviifolium, Cyperus rotundus ,Coriandrum sativum, Asparagus racemosus having antimicrobial activity with special reference to enteric pathogens.

The matter of prevention of mass from contaminated, decomposed of meat has also found in Kautilaya Arthashastra which is much practical to prevent epidemiology.

CONCLUSION: Food Poisoning caused by Bacteria can be managed & prevented successfully by applying the basic concept & Drugs of Ayurveda.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS: The review writing and other work would be futile if I do not express my respected Guide Dr. Sharad M. Porte under whose affectionate guidance this tenacious task was accomplished. I express my deepest gratitude towards Dr. Ramakant Sharma Chulet (Head of Dept. of Agad Tantra) and Dr. Anita Sharma for his valuable suggestions, ideas and help throughout my work.

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    How to cite this article:Sainia S and Porte SM: Ayurvedic Aspect of Bacteria and Bacterial Food Poisoning: A Review. Int J Pharm Sci Res 2015; 6(6): 2281-90.doi: 10.13040/IJPSR.0975-8232.6(6).2281-90.All © 2013 are reserved by International Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences and Research. This Journal licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

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